“A spate of women-authored speculative fiction imagines detailed worlds of widespread infertility, criminalized abortion, and flipped power dynamics”

The Atlantic

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“‘You’re hearing about everything that dies, you’re not hearing about everything that’s still alive,’ she says. ‘If you think it’s dead already then you’re not going to be bothered. I almost think people gravitate towards “It’s too late,” because then they don’t have to put themselves out.’ And then, as if casually reminding me just why her fiction, that patient, painstaking evocation of worlds, makes sense as a response to an emergency, she says: ‘Only if you love something will you inconvenience yourself to work on its behalf.'”

The Guardian

“The pragmatist philosopher William James had a crisp and consistent response when asked if life was worth living: maybe”

— Aeon

“A new book of Wilde’s handwritten manuscripts, The Picture of Dorian Gray (SP Books, $250), grants readers unfiltered access to lines of pure, unadulterated affection that the author was compelled to omit if he ever wanted the story to become the literary success it did.”

The New York Times

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“In the fall of 1956, the Soviet Union crushed an uprising in Hungary, swiftly ending an attempt to escape the superpower’s grip on the Eastern bloc. The Soviet tanks that rolled through Budapest also brought an end to the belief of many intellectuals and artists here in the ideals of Communism.

The Hungarian composer Gyorgy Kurtag, then 30, felt his whole world collapse that year. “Not just the outside world, but my inner universe, too,” he once said in an interview.

Mr. Kurtag spent the next two years in Paris, seeking new meaning for his life and work under the guidance of a psychoanalyst. He studied with the composer Olivier Messiaen, and heard the music of Anton Webern and Arnold Schoenberg at concerts given by Pierre Boulez. From the isolation of Communist Hungary, he had emerged into the West’s center of musical modernism.

It was in Paris during this period that Mr. Kurtag first saw Samuel Beckett’s play “Endgame.” The encounter set him on a lifelong journey, studying Beckett’s works and creating music inspired by them. Six decades later, on Nov. 15, this odyssey — and the career of one of the last living giants of 20th-century music — will culminate in Mr. Kurtag’s long-awaited, long-delayed first opera, based on “Endgame,” at the Teatro alla Scala in Milan.”

The New York Times