Hugh Haughton
Hugh Haughton

In honour Hugh Haughton on his birthday, the Department of English and Related Literature, the University of York is hosting a poetic and scholarly “cerebration”. We commence on Friday 8 June with an evening of poetry, featuring readings by:

Gerald Dawe · Kit Fan · Bernard O’Donoghue · Caitríona O’Reilly · Peter Robinson (more…)

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Celebrating the women’s civil rights movement

Today marks International Women’s Day, which has commemorated the struggle for women’s civil rights throughout the twentieth century. The day was originally known as International Working Women’s Day, and for most of its history has been connected with socialist movements and communist states such as China and Soviet Russia. In the mid-1970s, during the height of Second Wave Feminism, the UN recognised International Women’s Day and invited its member states to do the same.

Reads for IWD 2018

A new digital project exploring the representation of women in photography launched on Instagram today
Ilse Bing (American, b. Germany, 1899–1998). Self‑Portrait with Leica, 1931. Gelatin silver print, printed 1985. George Eastman Museum, purchase with funds from the Charina Foundation. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum. © Estate of Ilse Bing
Ilse Bing (American, b. Germany, 1899–1998). Self‑Portrait with Leica, 1931. Gelatin silver print, printed 1985. George Eastman Museum, purchase with funds from the Charina Foundation. Courtesy of the George Eastman Museum. © Estate of Ilse Bing

Object Women will feature images from across the history of photography, from the beginning of the medium in the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. New images will be released on weekdays over a two-month period, and each image will be accompanied by a brief written reflection by Cardiff University academic Alix Beeston.

The project draws on the extensive photographic holdings of the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York, the world’s oldest museum dedicated to photography. Its focus is dispersed and idiosyncratic, taking in both the artistic and commercial uses of photography, as well as a wide range of technological and aesthetic forms and traditions. (more…)

Marc Farrant on the major international conference that sparked new ways of thinking about the South African Nobel laureate
Coetzee, John 2010 (Photo by Marsha Miller)
J. M. Coetzee

How did you first encounter J. M. Coetzee, and what was it that sparked the idea for co-organising a conference on Coetzee & the Archive?

Like many Coetzee readers my first encounter was with the novel Disgrace. I was studying for a Masters at UCL and Disgrace was a core text on the year-long module covering modern English literature from the late nineteenth-century. It was immediately obvious why the novel was the on course, not least from the mixed reactions it provoked. Indeed, it was the only text we covered that year to garner opprobrium from some students in class. It’s a difficult read, the opening scenes that feature a licentious older man preying on one of his students, followed by the rape of his own daughter, test a reader’s mettle. But, it seemed to me at the time and still does, the open hostility the novel received required that one either ignore or abnegate a great deal of the responsibility the text places on the reader: the demand to respond to the ethical issues posed in the work beyond the staid and inherited conventions of moral outrage; to respond to the subtlety of a complex narrative voice that constitutes one of the best ever representations of complicity in the literary tradition, of the complicity of a liberal and educated conscience in crisis. Disgrace broaches the difficult terrain between both redemption and salvation, neither of which will fully serve since both partake of a certain violence or act of exclusion that would appear to tarnish the self-righteous anger of the oppressed as much as the villainy of the oppressor. If readers nevertheless insist that the novel is irresponsible it is therefore irresponsible, I would add, in the sense of informing us that it is perhaps never possible to be responsible enough, that responsibility is always lacking. Given its slender size the above, plus the intricate folds of literary and theological allusions, and the critique of the rationalizing project of secular modernity, makes for quite a novel! (more…)

A conference at the University of York • 17-19 May 2018

This conference marks the publication of 30 books in the two book series Historicizing Modernism and Modernist Archives with Bloomsbury Academic.

Archival excavation and detailed contextualisation is becoming increasingly central to scholarship on literary modernism. In recent years, the increased – and often online – accessibility and dissemination of previously unpublished or little-known texts has led to paradigm-shifting scholarly interventions across a range of canonical and lesser-known authors, neglected topics, and critical methodologies including genetic criticism, intertextuality, book history, and historical documentation. This trend is only bound to increase as large-scale digitisation of archival materials gathers pace, and existing copyright restrictions gradually lapse.

These two book series have been at the forefront of this burgeoning trend, and this international conference will take stock of these developments. Above all, it will also point forwards, towards future avenues of research. The authors and editorial board members connected with the series will reflect upon the ‘state of the art’ regarding archive-based research within their particular sub-discipline, connecting this to Modernism Studies as a whole. The provisional paper titles listed below reflect their responses to this invitation. (more…)