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Wim Wenders, Once: Pictures and Stories.

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Robin Holland
Robin Holland

“Last week we were saddened to learn that photographer Robin Holland had passed away at the age of sixty. In the work she did for a long list of collaborators and clients, including publications like the Village Voice and the New York Times, Holland shot everyone from politicians and celebrities to ordinary New Yorkers. But she had a particularly keen eye for artists, and her unfailingly perceptive portraits of some of the world’s greatest directors—David Lynch, Lucrecia Martel, Chantal Akerman, Werner Herzog, Spike Lee—demonstrated a deep passion for cinema and a sensitivity to its creators, making her a trusted figure in New York City’s film culture.”

— The Criterion Collection

“Well, some of these old films I feel now that I was too impressed with movies I had seen and I only learned later on in my career that it was better not to refer to other movies but to refer to experiences you had on your own. The new films that were not really quoting other movies, I think I was happy with now in hindsight.”

— Wim Wenders, Collider

“[My characters] were drifters and searchers and they looked for something. The journey was a state of mind for them. And also, the filmmaking journey is a way of working that allows you to experience what the film is about, and to have the adventure that the film is supposed to represent for the audience. Most adventure films are made by film crews who are not going for the adventure. They are pretending to do the adventure. In a road movie you really go into the adventure, you go into the unknown, and you are faced with the unknown. You are not just producing it, you are experiencing it. I love that more, because the audience will be entering it and witness you actually doing it. That is a fantastic notion.”

— Wim Wenders, cited in Interview Magazine

Harry Dean Stanton in Paris, Texas (dir. Wim Wenders, 1984)

Harry Dean Stanton has been a prominent presence in American cinema for sixty years. In the early days he haunted the margins of classic films like Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather: Part II (1974) where we glimpse him playing pool, or sitting behind Frankie Pentangeli during an FBI hearing. He is unforgettable as the grumbling engineer in Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979), “right”? And it didn’t take long for this masterful character actor to find his way to the forefront. My favourite Stanton performance is his role as the lead in Wim Wenders’ 1984 film Paris, Texas. But there are also noteworthy appearances in several David Lynch projects: from Wild at Heart (1990), Twin Peaks: Fear Walk With Me (1992), to the ailing brother in The Straight Story (1999), to his appearance in the wilfully bizarre short film The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1988). And that’s to say nothing of his work with directors like John Huston or Martin Scorsese. An impressive body of work. Happy birthday!

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“Dutch cinematographer Robby Müller has given us some of the most transcendent images ever captured on-screen. Since beginning his career in the late sixties, he has lensed a wealth of indelible moments—from Harry Dean Stanton wandering alone through the vast Southwestern desert in Wim Wenders’s Paris, Texas to the jailbirds of Jim Jarmusch’s Down by Law on their odyssey through the lush Louisiana bayou. This summer, Müller’s inimitable career is being honored with a retrospective at the Eye museum in Amsterdam.”

More at The Criterion Current.

“Wenders, while so very influenced by American movies and pop culture, is not American and thus not constrained by this unspoken, insidious mandate to preserve the notion of children as idealized by adults. His freedom of imagination and thought to create Alice, and the room he granted his actors, Rottländer and Rüdiger Vogler, resulted in one of the screen’s most multifaceted child characters, and one of the most empowered female characters in cinema to this day.”

More at The Criterion Current.