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“Showtime [has] previewed its first Twin Peaks VR experience, which will be available for fans to buy on Steam for HTC Vive and Oculus Rift sometime in 2019. The demo, on display at the Festival of Disruption—a two-day event curated by Lynch where art, music and meditation intersect—immersed viewers into key scenes of the show. However, the full experience will eventually be a one-hour production created by Showtime and Collider, with guidance from Lynch himself.”

Adweek

“[Jonathan] Demme’s dive into the deviant undercurrents of America at the end of the Reagan-Bush era gripped audiences who had been primed by another auteur’s breaking of the barriers between art and exploitation. Moody and visceral as no prime-time series had ever been before, David Lynch’s Twin Peaks (1990–91) was a twisted tale founded on the naked corpse of a teenage girl—Laura Palmer. A quarter of a century later, viewers who had been bingeing on the original Twin Peaks as it was released on various digital platforms along with its prequel, the theatrical feature Fire Walk with Me (1992), avidly consumed Twin Peaks: The Return during its eighteen-episode run on Showtime, finding themselves trapped in a wormhole, also known as the Lynchian unconscious, where the homicidal law of the father is forever unchecked and unchanged. The return of Twin Peaks roughly coincided with the appearance of a new restoration of The Silence of the Lambs in theaters, and now in this release. This dialectician of gender in popular culture relishes the timing. […] One major thing that distinguishes Demme’s film from Twin Peaks—and from the vast majority of serial-killer investigative dramas, including those of another contemporary auteur, David Fincher—is the fact that his hero is a woman. “

The Criterion Collection

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“I often wonder if Lynch is the era’s most original artist, or at least the creator of its most haunting images—the severed ear in Blue Velvet, the Red Room in Twin Peaks, the Mystery Man in Lost Highway—but his works feel too schlocky, seedy, tearful, too male, too white for me to want to say this often in conversation. His cinema is disreputably baroque, brimming with meaning that it seems to disavow. He’s of the same generation as Terrence Malick, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese, but where they now seem historical, Lynch still has the fragility of the contemporary. The greatness of his art seems directly linked to the kitsch of his materials, all the B-movie unheimlich maneuvers: doppelgängers, prosthetics, recurring numbers, dream sequences, animated corpses. And this, I think, is an enigma worth pursuing.”

— Adam Thirlwell, The New York Review of Books

American filmmaker answers questions from the audience at a recent photographic exhibition

“What matters is what you believe happened. […] Many things in life just happen and we have to come to our own conclusions. You can, for example, read a book that raises a series of questions, and you want to talk to the author, but he died a hundred years ago. That’s why everything is up to you.”

David Lynch

In October 2014, it was announced that David Lynch and Mark Frost would be returning to the world of Twin Peaks, the television drama series which followed the intuitions of FBI agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) as he investigated the death of high school homecoming queen Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). Twin Peaks is the name of the small northwestern town where the murder takes place, and is home to a community of eccentric personalities and troubled figures. First aired in 1990, Twin Peaks become a cultural phenomenon that spanned two series and a feature-length film (Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, 1992). The show secured David Lynch lasting mainstream recognition, and the show has influenced countless television series since.

Lynch and Frost’s continuation of the story in Twin Peaks: The Return, aired by Showtime, has offered some of the most boldly audacious television of the twenty-first century. The series has been ingenious in its use of timing and dialogue to generate mystery, suspense, and humour, and the writing and performances have been superb throughout. I found the two-hour finale confusing for a number of reasons, but I also found it appropriate to the story Lynch and Frost were telling: for me, it was haunting and deeply moving. (more…)

Saul Anton (Frieze) is watching David Lynch‘s Twin Peaks: The Return, and offers what he calls  “a rudimentary sketch of the motley tableau of Americana that Lynch strings together into some of the most mesmerizing, bizarre, and funny television I can remember.” [Read More]

David Lynch at work at his home, the Beverly Johnson House in the Hollywood Hills, CA. Photograph: Patrick Fraser
David Lynch at work at his home, the Beverly Johnson House in the Hollywood Hills, CA. Photograph: Patrick Fraser

Spent some time yesterday afternoon touring the Universität Basel in Switzerland. Aside from walking the city streets and dipping my feet into the Rhine, I’ve been devoting some time to reading. As I mentioned in previous posts (1, 2), I am enjoying Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. I am also slipping back into the world Twin Peaks, which has reignited my fascination with all things Lynchian. Here are a few of the articles that have caught my attention over the last day or so:

LA Weekly has posted a fantastic gallery of David Lynch shooting locations, with accompanying stills from Eraserhead, Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, and Inland Empire • “[A] heady whiff of Jacques Tati and Buster Keaton” — Tom Huddleston recaps episodes 5-6 of Twin Peaks: The Return • German image-maker Michael Wolf‘s first retrospective exhibition shows urban living at its most extreme • Listen to the history of rock music before and after Radiohead‘s OK Computer • Ali Smith on meeting W.G. Sebald • The pros and cons of the digitized Walt Whitman and his “lost” novels • Miroslaw Balka and Joseph Rykwert discuss how art and architecture shape the politics of memory around conflict • Why American modernism is older than you think

In a conversation published by VultureDavid Marchese asks artist and filmmaker David Lynch about the reboot of his cult 1990s drama:

After being away from the world of Twin Peaks for so long, was it hard to find your way back into the atmosphere of the show and the minds of the characters?
It was just like rolling off a log.

Is that a good thing or a bad thing?
It’s a very good thing, David. It’s hard to stay on a log. It’s easy to roll off.

You could hit your head, though.
That would be bad, David. I mean to say I know the world of Twin Peaks. You get Douglas firs in that part of the Pacific Northwest rather than ponderosa pine. I love vertical-grain Douglas-fir plywood. I love that world and all the characters from the original series. It feels like only a moment ago we were working on the original and then, a moment later, we’re stepping back into it. It’s just like that.

Lynch also shares his favourite topic of conversation (hint: it involves sitting quietly) and speculates on the importance of television since the decline of arthouse cinema.

Helen Hollyman (Munchies) talks to the American filmmaker and artist about his love of the espresso, the latte, and the cappuccino
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David Lynch

Do you remember the first time you drank a cup of coffee?
I don’t remember the first time exactly, but I’d like to think that I was loving coffee from an early age.

How early are we talking here?
I’m not sure, but I might have been quite little. Maybe three.

Three?
I’m not sure about that, but as a kid I always loved the smell of coffee roasting and brewing.

OK, so what do you consider a ‘good’ cup?
For me, it’s the flavor. It should have no bitterness, and it should be smooth and rich in flavor. I like to drink espresso with milk, like a latte or a cappuccino, but the espresso should have a golden foam. It can be so beautiful, Helen. (more…)

Luke Buckmaster (BBC Culture) explains the significance of David Lynch’s dreamlike Hollywood mystery

42a25-mulholland-drive-set-designCinema in the early years of the 21st Century has experienced something of an existential crisis. Terms such as ‘TV-like’ or ‘television-esque’ were once intended as insults; now, in a period most commentators consider a new ‘golden age of television’ – a Don Draper here, a Walter White there – that is no longer the case. So, if television has evolved to a point where it is no longer considered an inferior art form, what does this mean for cinema? (more…)

Harry Dean Stanton in Paris, Texas (dir. Wim Wenders, 1984)

Harry Dean Stanton has been a prominent presence in American cinema for sixty years. In the early days he haunted the margins of classic films like Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather: Part II (1974) where we glimpse him playing pool, or sitting behind Frankie Pentangeli during an FBI hearing. He is unforgettable as the grumbling engineer in Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979), “right”? And it didn’t take long for this masterful character actor to find his way to the forefront. My favourite Stanton performance is his role as the lead in Wim Wenders’ 1984 film Paris, Texas. But there are also noteworthy appearances in several David Lynch projects: from Wild at Heart (1990), Twin Peaks: Fear Walk With Me (1992), to the ailing brother in The Straight Story (1999), to his appearance in the wilfully bizarre short film The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1988). And that’s to say nothing of his work with directors like John Huston or Martin Scorsese. An impressive body of work. Happy birthday!

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Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me has been scrubbed from the memories of many Twin Peaks fans, but it’s best not to forget that David Bowie was in the film, as Agent Phillip Jeffries. He appears as a dream vision in a weird montage to his former buddies Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) and Gordon Cole (David Lynch) and provides key information to cracking the case. It seems now that Bowie had signed on to reprise the role for Showtime’s upcoming revival of the show, though his passing in January came too soon for him to film his parts.”

More at Flavorwire.

The full album is available to stream online, free of charge (via Open Culture).

Showtime’s reboot hosts a number of new and familiar faces

welcome-to-twin-peaks-new-sign-revealed-david-lynch Actors from the original who are back include Sheryl Lee, Sherilyn Fenn, Mädchen Amick, David Duchovny, Michael Horse, Dana Ashbrook, Miguel Ferrer, Ray Wise, Grace Zabriskie, Peggy Lipton, Everett McGill and David Lynch. The late Catherine Coulson, known to fans as the Log Lady, is also listed.

New additions include Naomi Watts, Amanda Seyfried, Ashley Judd, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Laura Dern, Ernie Hudson, Michael Cera, Trent Reznor, Jessica Szohr, Jane Levy, Richard Chamberlain, Robert Knepper, Jim Belushi, Tom Sizemore, Ethan Suplee, Balthazar Getty, Bailey Chase, David Koechner, and Larry Clarke. [Read More]

Michael Roffman (Consequence of Sound) on the distribution options for the reboot
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Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne) and Kyle MachLachlan (Agent Dale Cooper) in the original Twin Peaks series

Now that The X-Files has closed up shop once again, it’s time to start salivating over Showtime’s forthcoming revival of Twin Peaks. Though, don’t go roasting any coffee or baking any pies just yet. We still have awhile before David Lynch officially invites us back to the small Pacific Northwest logging town. (more…)