The novelist on unusual cinema experiences, LGBTQ history and the genius of Happy Valley (Source: The Guardian).

Cardiff University • 19-21 April 2017
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Design: Rhys Tranter

Edward Thomas is a poet of retrospect. His poetry memorialises states of mind, people, and places. It also attempts to voice what is absolutely lost and what was never significant: ‘so many things I have forgot/ That once were much to me, or that were not’, he writes. Thomas also considers obscure futures for others and for himself. His poetry anticipates indifference as much as longevity when it asks what they will ‘do when I am gone?’: ‘they will do without me as the rain/ Can do without the flowers and the grass’.

What should we do with Thomas, whose reputation and writing is more present than ever? In 2017, we will mark the centenary of his death with a major conference at Cardiff University, where an important collection of Thomas’s manuscript materials and letters are held at SCOLAR. With the preparation of a major edition of his prose and with his acknowledged centrality to new forms of nature writing, study of Thomas is now rarely confined to any single aspect of his practice. We want to celebrate Thomas and approaches to his work in the fullest possible diversity. (more…)

The Inaugural Modernist Network Cymru Conference

The Research Institute of the Arts and Humanities
Swansea University, Monday 7 September 2015
Keynote speaker: Professor Angharad Price (Bangor University)

monc-modernist-network-cymruThe 2010s have been a busy decade for modernist scholars. In 2010, the inaugural BAMS conference considered Virginia Woolf’s (in)famous assertion that ‘On or about December 1910, human character changed’; in 2013, BBC Radio 3 ran a series of programmes celebrating Paris’ annus mirabilis, exemplified by the 1913 premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring; and in 2014 we celebrated Dylan Thomas’ birth in a year-long series of events.

Now, in 2015, as we mark 100 years since Caradoc Evans’ landmark short story collection, My People, it seems a good time to stop and take stock of the past, present and future of both modernism and modernist studies as a discipline.

This inaugural conference, to be held at Swansea University, invites scholars from Wales and beyond to reflect upon modernism and its legacies. As the first Modernist Network Cymru (MONC) event, it aims to showcase the range and diversity of research into modernism happening in Wales today. MONC brings together scholars and professionals working on modernism in Wales to encourage collaboration and communication; as such, we welcome interdisciplinary proposals on any aspect of modernism, as defined in the widest sense. We particularly welcome scholars working on Welsh modernist writers and artists, as well as modernist art and writing in Wales. (more…)