“Though his work is not as widely known as some of his contemporaries — J.G. Ballard, for example, or Anthony Burgess — D.G. Compton’s speculative fiction is just as attuned to the relation between technology and death.”

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You can now download issues of the pulp horror and fantasy magazine (1923-1954), which includes stories by H. P. Lovecraft, Ray Bradbury, and many more. Source: Open Culture.Save

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“Canadian author says she is humbled to accept reward and is praised by judges for championing environmental and human rights causes”

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Channel 4 announces a new science-fiction series based on the work of the American writer

“Channel 4 announced this morning that Bryan Cranston has signed on to star in a ‘hugely ambitious’ 10 part anthology series for the UK network based on the short stories of acclaimed sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick, who’s provided the film and television worlds with a fare share of their most affecting sci-fi visions.”

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Edward Docx (The Guardian) reviews the controversial new novel by Dave Eggers

DaveEggers-the-circle-illustration.jpgIn a recent essay published in these pages, Jonathan Franzen inveighed against what he sees as the glibness and superficiality of the new online culture. “With technoconsumerism,” he wrote, “a humanist rhetoric of ’empowerment’ and ‘creativity’ and ‘freedom’ and ‘connection’ and ‘democracy’ abets the frank monopolism of the techno-titans; the new infernal machine seems increasingly to obey nothing but its own developmental logic, and it’s far more enslavingly addictive, and far more pandering to people’s worst impulses, than newspapers ever were.”

I cite this because it chimes with the points that Dave Eggers is making in his latest novel, The Circle; we are at an interesting moment when two such significant figures of American letters have both independently been so moved to expound on the same subject. But my guess is that Eggers won’t suffer the same online crucifixion that has subsequently been Franzen’s fate. Why? Because although Eggers is saying all the same things as Franzen (and so much more), he makes his case not through the often tetchy medium of the essay, but in the glorious, ever resilient and ever engaging form of the novel.

The Circle is a deft modern synthesis of Swiftian wit with Orwellian prognostication. That is not to say the writing is without formal weaknesses – Eggers misses notes like an enthusiastic jazz pianist, whereas Franzen is all conservatoire meticulousness – but rather to suggest that The Circle is a work so germane to our times that it may well come to be considered as the most on-the-money satirical commentary on the early internet age. [Read More]

The Paris Review shares ‘The Eyes Have It’ online.

In his critical introduction to the Gothic, Fred Botting explores how Ridley Scott’s films engage with its major themes and motifs…
Sigourney Weaver and Ridley Scott on the set of Alien (1979)
Sigourney Weaver and Ridley Scott on the set of Alien (1979)

In Alien (1979) other Gothic associations are brought to the fore. The wrecked alien spaceship and the bleak planet suggest the gloom, ruin and awful desolation of Gothic architecture and landscape. The coded message the spaceship transmits is not a distress signal, but a warning which goes unheeded by the human cargo ship that attends the call. Unaware of the dangers that their employers, another sinister and powerful corporation, have put them in, the crew are unwitting victims of their attempt to secure the power and profit of possessing such an efficient and utterly inhuman killing machine. The horror of the alien lies not only in its lethal power: its parasitical mode of procreation, using human bodies as hosts, means that it is a threat that emerges from within. (more…)

The term ‘cyberspace’ was coined by science fiction author William Gibson in his 1982 short story, ‘Burning Chrome’. [Source]