Running 16 September to 2 October 2016
seymour-hoffman
Philip Seymour Hoffman

From Time Out: It’s hard to believe that Philip Seymour Hoffman is two years gone—he’s still at work in my mind. When I run across Boogie Nights or Synecdoche, New York, there’s no way I can think of him as anything but alive. Astoria’s Museum of the Moving Image will be celebrating Hoffman’s sizable legacy with a selective series, “The Master,” running September 16 through October 2. Per the museum’s website, screenings will be accompanied by “guest appearances, to be announced, and clips from his other films, to showcase his astonishing versatility.” A complete list of titles has yet to be announced, but so far the picks are strong: Jack Goes Boating, The Master, The Savages, Boogie Nights, Almost Famous, Capote, Doubt, Happiness, Synecdoche, New York, Owning Mahowny, Magnolia, Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead, 25th Hour, The Talented Mr. Ripley, A Most Wanted Man. Those are pretty much the ones we’d choose—don’t miss Owning Mahowny, a terrific portrayal of gambling addiction and, unwittingly, the most heartbreaking performance of Hoffman’s career. [Read More]

“The film places Thom Yorke at its centre, and we watch as he prowls restlessly through a series of rooms, which change with each new door opened. If these are the corridors of Yorke’s mind, it is crammed and complex…”

More at Creative Review.

Production designer and long-term Malick collaborator discusses working on Knight of Cups.

Critics respond to Paul Thomas Anderson’s 2014 film, the first adaptation of a Thomas Pynchon novel

Peter Bradshaw (The Guardian)

uncorrected-jonathan-cape-proof-thomas-pynchon-inherent-vice
Uncorrected Proof of Thomas Pynchon’s Inherent Vice

After a publishing career of more than 50 years, Thomas Pynchon has finally allowed one of his novels to be filmed. Inherent Vice, which has been adapted and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, is all about a stoner private detective named Larry “Doc” Sportello in 1970 southern California, called in by an ex-girlfriend to investigate the sinister disappearance of her married lover. It is an occult mystery upon which Doc attempts to shed light using the torch he still carries for her.

The resulting movie is a delirious triumph: a stylish-squared meeting of creative minds, a swirl of hypnosis and symbiosis, with Pynchon’s prose partly assigned to a narrating character and partly diversified into funky dialogue exchanges. Each enigmatic narrative development is a twist of the psychedelic kaleidoscope. (more…)

The Paris Review has transcribed a recent interview with the American filmmaker

Paul Thomas Anderson: When I was at Emerson for that year, David Foster Wallace, who was a great writer who was not known then, was my teacher—he was my English teacher … It was the first teacher I fell in love with. I’d never found anybody else like that at any of the other schools I’d been to. Which makes me really reticent to talk shit about schools or anything else, because it’s just like anyplace—if you could find a good teacher, man, I’m sure school would be great. (more…)