An incredibly relevant and perceptive article on the psychopathology of fascism
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J. G. Ballard

The psychopath never dates.

Hitler’s contemporaries – Baldwin, Chamberlain, Herbert Hoover – seem pathetically fusty figures, with their frock coats and wing collars, closer to the world of Edison, Carnegie and the hansom cab than to the first fully evolved modern societies over which they presided, areas of national consciousness formed by mass-produced newspapers and consumer goods, advertising and tele-communications. By comparison Hitler is completely up-to-date, and would be equally at home in the sixties (and probably even more so in the seventies) as in the twenties. The whole apparatus of the Nazi super-state, its nightmare uniforms and propaganda, seems weirdly turned-on, providing just that element of manifest insanity to which we all respond in the H-Bomb or Viet Nam – perhaps one reason why the American and Russian space programmes have failed to catch our imaginations is that this quality of explicit psychopathology is missing. (more…)

‘The trivia is exceptional’: DeLillo on the Kennedy Assassination
Don DeLillo
Don DeLillo

Among the treasures online at The Paris Review is a 1993 interview with American novelist Don DeLillo. Adam Begley talks to the writer about everything from his work routine to world politics to his unique brand of dialogue. (more…)