Trevor Logan unpacks some of the religious and philosophical allusions of Terrence Malick’s recent film. Thank you to Caleb Sivyer for the link.

Production designer and long-term Malick collaborator discusses working on Knight of Cups.

Richard Brody discusses the American director’s new film about Hollywood ennui
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Christian Bale and Natalie Portman star in Knight of Cups (2015)
Perhaps no film in the history of cinema follows the movement of memory as faithfully, as passionately, or as profoundly as Terrence Malick’s new film, “Knight of Cups.” It’s an instant classic in several genres—the confessional, the inside-Hollywood story, the Dantesque midlife-crisis drama, the religious quest, the romantic struggle, the sexual reverie, the family melodrama—because the protagonist’s life, like most people’s lives, involves intertwined strains of activity that don’t just overlap but are inseparable from each other. The movie runs less than two hours and its focus is intimate, but its span seems enormous—not least because Malick has made a character who’s something of an alter ego, and he endows that character with an artistic identity and imagination as vast and as vital as his own.

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