“I’ve found you’ve got to look back at the old things and see them in a new light.” — John Coltrane

Recommended Records

  • A Love Supreme (Impulse!, 1965)
  • Blue Train (Blue Note, 1958)
  • Giant Steps (Atlantic, 1959)

Read More: John Coltrane: Becoming “a force for good” • A Love Supreme: 51st Anniversary • A Love Supreme: Rare Photographs of John Coltrane • Writing a Life of John Coltrane

john-coltrane

“I want to be a force for real good. In other words. I know that there are bad forces, forces that bring suffering to others and misery to the world, but I want to be the opposite force. I want to be the force which is truly for good”

— John Coltrane

A television interview with the African-American scholar, first broadcast in 2000

Tenor saxophonist reflects on a career spanning more than 65 years
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Sonny Rollins

One of the last in a generation of jazz greats, Sonny Rollins once thought music could change the world. His optimism about humanity has since vanished but, at 85, he still has much he wants to say.

The “Saxophone Colossus”, a nickname that was also the title of his seminal 1956 album, is among a handful of sax players including John Coltrane, Charlie Parker and Coleman Hawkins who defined the instrument, with Rollins creating a heavy-charging, mordant style that was also readily experimental.

The hard-working tenor saxophonist has taken several extended sabbaticals, most famously when he temporarily retired – yet would practice on New York’s Williamsburg Bridge. He later moved to India and Japan to explore spirituality. (more…)

From Ted Gioia’s article on Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist novel, Nausea
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Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

In general, Sartre is more committed to philosophy than to fiction, even here in the pages of his greatest novel. But when the story lags, the intensity of the intellectual debate flares up to compensate—so much so, that Nausea is essential reading not just for students of literature, but also for anyone interested in the evolution of Sartre’s views on a range of philosophical issues.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this book is Sartre’s decision to supply a happy ending. His horror story ends with a way out of the nausea. I am less than convinced by this turnabout in our suffering Mr. Roquentin, but as a longtime jazz lover, I am secretly pleased at the cure for the existential nausea. A jazz record featuring a singer and saxophonist does the trick—to be specific an old recording of “Some of These Days.” I only wish Sartre had been more specific about the names of the musicians on the date (he doesn’t identify any of them). I would love to hear the jazz record that trumps Freud, cures the ill, and solves existential angst. (more…)

Alex Belth introduces a profile of the jazz singer taken from Jazz Is
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Billie Holiday

When I first started listening to jazz I was overwhelmed. I didn’t know how I’d ever be able to tell the difference between Clifford Brown and Lee Morgan, didn’t know how I’d ever determine the difference between John Coltrane and someone imitating Coltrane. I’m still an amateur but I can tell you this: the first performers I could identify by ear were Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, and Billie Holiday. Their sound is so specific, so singular, that even to the untrained ear, they are identifiable.

We’re lucky that Nat Hentoff was on hand to record so much of the Jazz scene in the ’50s and ’60s, and here he cuts through the popular mythology that often obscures Holiday’s great talent and shows us the depth of her musical gift. [Read More]