‘A Nice Cup of Tea,’ originally published in the Evening Standard on 12 January 1946 (Source)

The Paris Review makes the announcement, with information on each of the writers.

Marjorie Perloff on the poet, playwright, novelist, futurist, feminist, designer of lamps, and bohemian
mina-loy-black-and-white-young
Mina Loy
“I was trying,” Mina Loy observed in 1927, with reference to her polyglot, punning, scholastic, asyntactic, unpunctuated free-verse poems, “to make a foreign language, because English had already been used.” So distinctive was Loy’s “logopoeia” (the term Ezra Pound invented to describe this particular poet’s “dance of the intelligence among words and ideas”), that it has taken the better part of the century for her to be appreciated for what she was–one of the central avant-garde poets writing in English. Indeed, Roger Conover’s collection The Lost Lunar Baedeker is more than a new edition of Loy’s poetry; it is the only available edition of her collected (although by no means complete) works. Together with Carolyn Burke’s long awaited biography of the mysterious Mina Loy, the Farrar, Straus collection (subsequently cited as FS) is thus a major literary event.

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From an 1984 interview with British novelist J. G. Ballard, relating his admiration for Beat writer William S. Burroughs

I have met Burroughs quite a few times over the last fifteen years, and he always strikes me as an upper-class Midwesterner, with an inherent superior attitude towards blacks, policemen, doctors, and small-town politicians, the same superior attitude that Swift had to their equivalents in his own day, the same scatological obsessions and brooding contempt for middle-class values, thrift, hard work, parenthood, et cetera, which are just excuses for petit-bourgeois greed and exploitation. But I admire Burroughs more than any other living writer, and most of those who are dead. [Read more]

Stars of X-Men franchise will appear in Harold Pinter play, The Guardian reports. They previously worked together in a touring production of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot.

George Orwell’s war diaries, spanning 1938-1942, are freely available to read online. Open Culture has the details.

In 1949, George Orwell received a curious letter from his former high school French teacher, Aldous Huxley. Open Culture has more.