Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf was first released on June 22, 1966 — 50 years ago to the day. At the time, the film, taken pretty much verbatim — with the exception of some scenic switches to alternate locations — from Edward Albee’s 1962 play, was lauded by critics who seemed to be just as disenchanted by their nuclear familial-prizing era as the play itself. This scathing, wholly unsubtle deconstruction of two marriages (that of a New England college president’s daughter, Martha, and a history professor, George, both middle-aged, and biologist Nick and housewife Honey, both in their late 20s) was an encapsulation of the tensions brought about by the heightened marital/childrearing ideals that invalidated all existence beyond them in the U.S. in the 1950s.”

More at Flavorwire.

Save

American academic and writer shares his passion for the work of Samuel Beckett with Electric Literature

Colin Winnette: What motivated this recommendation?

Brian Evenson: It’s a book I’m very fond of, and I tend to think contemporary American fiction would be more interesting if more writers knew Molloy.I tend to think contemporary American fiction would be more interesting if more writers knew Molloy.

I think it’s also a very funny book (though weird humor sometimes) and has some amazing sentences. (more…)