Showtime’s reboot hosts a number of new and familiar faces

welcome-to-twin-peaks-new-sign-revealed-david-lynch Actors from the original who are back include Sheryl Lee, Sherilyn Fenn, Mädchen Amick, David Duchovny, Michael Horse, Dana Ashbrook, Miguel Ferrer, Ray Wise, Grace Zabriskie, Peggy Lipton, Everett McGill and David Lynch. The late Catherine Coulson, known to fans as the Log Lady, is also listed.

New additions include Naomi Watts, Amanda Seyfried, Ashley Judd, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Laura Dern, Ernie Hudson, Michael Cera, Trent Reznor, Jessica Szohr, Jane Levy, Richard Chamberlain, Robert Knepper, Jim Belushi, Tom Sizemore, Ethan Suplee, Balthazar Getty, Bailey Chase, David Koechner, and Larry Clarke. [Read More]

Michael Roffman (Consequence of Sound) on the distribution options for the reboot
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Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne) and Kyle MachLachlan (Agent Dale Cooper) in the original Twin Peaks series

Now that The X-Files has closed up shop once again, it’s time to start salivating over Showtime’s forthcoming revival of Twin Peaks. Though, don’t go roasting any coffee or baking any pies just yet. We still have awhile before David Lynch officially invites us back to the small Pacific Northwest logging town. (more…)

Production designer and long-term Malick collaborator discusses working on Knight of Cups.

Few artists have excited me like David Bowie. As a teenager, the punk electronica of Low, the bombast of “Heroes”, and the angular anthems of Lodger helped me acclimatise to living alone in the city.

There was also the glacial paranoid chic of Station to Station, the throbs and screeches of Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps), a panorama of the 1980s New York, to say nothing of the postmodern murder mystery, 1. Outside. (I can still remember the thrill of hearing songs from the latter album opening David Lynch’s Lost Highway and closing David Fincher’s Seven.)

All of these records, alongside those by Bowie collaborators Brian Eno, Iggy Pop, and Lou Reed, became the soundtrack to my undergraduate years. Neurotic, pulsing, existential pop.

I found in David Bowie a fantastic empty signifier, a blank canvas ready and waiting for me to impose and inscribe my obsessions. During these years he became my idol. Not simply someone to identify with, but an idea or an image that I aspired toward: a striking embodiment of the power of art to transform ourselves and the world around us.

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From Sara Barnes (Beautiful Decay):
Photograph: David Lynch
Photograph: David Lynch

If you’re familiar with the films of David Lynch, then you know the subtle uneasiness that he makes you feel. It doesn’t just stop with movies, as Lynch is also a photographer. Between 1980 and 2000, he shot monochromatic images of factories in Berlin, Poland, New York, New Jersey, and England. The result is a book of photographs titled The Factory Photographs […]. (more…)

David Lynch
David Lynch
Tim Walker (The Independent) asks David Lynch his opinions on television, film, art and his recent music projects

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Richard B. Woodward (The Paris Review) pays tribute to the Oscar-winning sound designer who helped create the otherworldly environments of David Lynch’s Eraserhead and Blue Velvet
Alan Splet
Alan Splet
“It’s too bad Ronnie Rocket never got made,” says Alan R. Splet about one of several David Lynch scripts still tied to Dino De Laurentiis’s bankruptcy. “There was lots of heavy electricity, amplified power in the script. It went back more toward the Eraserhead side of things. Maybe David feels he’s moved beyond that.”

Splet starts to laugh nervously, almost maniacally, as he recites all the kinds of electricity he could produce if called upon by Lynch. “There’s snapping, humming, buzzing, banging, like lightning, shrieking, squealing …”

As the sound engineer who has worked with Lynch since The Grandmother, their AFI student film completed in 1969, Splet saves up noises that he thinks his friend will like and sends them along on cassettes for Lynch to use or enjoy. (more…)

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On the set of Eraserhead

An excerpt from Chris Rodley’s wonderful book, Lynch on Lynch, quoted by Criterion Collection

Eraserhead took five years to complete. You must have been completely dedicated to the film to sustain both the project and your own enthusiasm over such an extended production period. What was it about the idea that you loved?

It was the world. In my mind, it was a world between a factory and a factory neighborhood. A little, unknown, twisted, almost silent lost spot where little details and little torments existed. And people were struggling in darkness. They’re living in those fringelands, and they’re the people I really love. Henry’s definitely one of those people. They kind of get lost in time. They’re either working in a factory or fiddling with something or other. It’s a world that’s neither here nor there. It came out of the air in Philadelphia. I always say it’s my Philadelphia Story. It just doesn’t have Jimmy Stewart in it!

I could be on the set at night, and I would imagine the whole world around it. I imagined walking out, and there were very few cars—there might be one far away, but in the shadows—and very few people. And the lights in the windows would be really dim, and there would be no movement in the window, and the coffee shop would be empty except for one person who didn’t speak properly. It was just like a mood. The life in that world . . . there was nothing like it. Things go so fast when you’re making a movie now that you’re not able to give the world enough—what it deserves. It wants to be lived in a little bit; it’s got so much to offer, and you’re going just a little too fast. It’s just sad. (more…)