“The first lesson a disaster teaches is that everything is connected. In fact, disasters, I found while living through a medium-sized one (the 1989 earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area) and later writing about major ones (including 9/11, Hurricane Katrina and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and Fukushima nuclear catastrophe in Japan), are crash courses in those connections. At moments of immense change, we see with new clarity the systems – political, economic, social, ecological – in which we are immersed as they change around us. We see what’s strong, what’s weak, what’s corrupt, what matters and what doesn’t.”

Rebecca Solnit, ‘The impossible has already happened’, in The Guardian, 7 April 2020.

The coronavirus has sparked a widespread cultural revaluation of writers who touched on themes of solitude in their work. Holland Carter takes a look at Henry David Thoreau’s WALDEN, and suggests that “there’s plenty to learn from standing still”. Source: The New York Times.

“Any adversity makes artists move closer to what is important, essential. Only time can show what fruits will such a focusing on the essential bear.”

In a new interview, Estonian composer Arvo Pärt suggests what the coronavirus might mean for society and the arts. Source: Arvo Pärt Centre.