“The film places Thom Yorke at its centre, and we watch as he prowls restlessly through a series of rooms, which change with each new door opened. If these are the corridors of Yorke’s mind, it is crammed and complex…”

More at Creative Review.

Owen Pritchard (It’s Nice That) reports on a new artwork by Cornelia Parker
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Cornelia Parker, Transitional Object (PsychoBarn)

British Artist Cornelia Parker has erected a replica of the house from Alfred Hitchcock’s seminal thriller Psycho on top of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. The commission will be on display, weather permitting, until 31 October this year. The work, titled Transitional Object (PsychoBarn), is a reconstruction of part of the iconic weather boarded mansion, consisting of two facades propped up by scaffolding. The 30ft tall artwork was fabricated from materials salvaged from a deconstructed red barn. [Read More]

Trevor Logan unpacks some of the religious and philosophical allusions of Terrence Malick’s recent film. Thank you to Caleb Sivyer for the link.

Production designer and long-term Malick collaborator discusses working on Knight of Cups.

Richard Brody discusses the American director’s new film about Hollywood ennui
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Christian Bale and Natalie Portman star in Knight of Cups (2015)
Perhaps no film in the history of cinema follows the movement of memory as faithfully, as passionately, or as profoundly as Terrence Malick’s new film, “Knight of Cups.” It’s an instant classic in several genres—the confessional, the inside-Hollywood story, the Dantesque midlife-crisis drama, the religious quest, the romantic struggle, the sexual reverie, the family melodrama—because the protagonist’s life, like most people’s lives, involves intertwined strains of activity that don’t just overlap but are inseparable from each other. The movie runs less than two hours and its focus is intimate, but its span seems enormous—not least because Malick has made a character who’s something of an alter ego, and he endows that character with an artistic identity and imagination as vast and as vital as his own.

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