Running 16 September to 2 October 2016
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Philip Seymour Hoffman

From Time Out: It’s hard to believe that Philip Seymour Hoffman is two years gone—he’s still at work in my mind. When I run across Boogie Nights or Synecdoche, New York, there’s no way I can think of him as anything but alive. Astoria’s Museum of the Moving Image will be celebrating Hoffman’s sizable legacy with a selective series, “The Master,” running September 16 through October 2. Per the museum’s website, screenings will be accompanied by “guest appearances, to be announced, and clips from his other films, to showcase his astonishing versatility.” A complete list of titles has yet to be announced, but so far the picks are strong: Jack Goes Boating, The Master, The Savages, Boogie Nights, Almost Famous, Capote, Doubt, Happiness, Synecdoche, New York, Owning Mahowny, Magnolia, Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead, 25th Hour, The Talented Mr. Ripley, A Most Wanted Man. Those are pretty much the ones we’d choose—don’t miss Owning Mahowny, a terrific portrayal of gambling addiction and, unwittingly, the most heartbreaking performance of Hoffman’s career. [Read More]

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2001: A Space Odyssey (dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1968)

From BFI: “Director Terry Gilliam reveals insights about Brazil (1985), his Orwellian retro-futurist fantasy. Gilliam also talks about his love of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), his dislike of middle management bureaucracy, and his experience of casting Robert De Niro.” (Source: BFI)

AnOther introduces Kubrick to beginners, anticipating an upcoming art exhibition celebrating the director’s films

When Stanley Kubrick paired soaring Beethoven with depraved violence in A Clockwork Orange (1971), audiences were shocked. He was behind so many innovations in cinema that “Kubrickian” has become a shorthand adjective for touches inspired by him, from anachronistic music to the fluid camerawork he favoured. (more…)

In this essay, first published in Grand Street in 1994, Dr. Strangelove coscreenwriter Terry Southern offers a lively behind-the-scenes look at the film’s production. Source: Criterion Collection.

Michael Herr, the writer famous for authoring the gritty Vietnam War testimonial Dispatches, has died at 76, after a long bout with illness according to Knopf, his former publisher. (more…)

The project is set to star August Diehl. Source: Flavorwire.

More at BR9732.

“Three very influential artists are partaking in the making of an upcoming Netflix miniseries. The first is Margaret Atwood, providing source material through her based-on-a-true-story crime novel, Alias Grace. The second is writer/director/actor Sarah Polley — known for her beautiful documentary Stories We Tell her odd, contemplative rom-com, Take This Waltz, and her Oscar nominated drama, Away From Her. According to Deadline, she’ll be writing and producing. And the third is American Psycho‘s Mary Harron, who’ll be directing.”

More at Flavorwire.

The second installment of The Directors Series’ examination of the films and careers of Joel and Ethan Coen. This half-hour documentary covers the Coens’ trio of “retro-surreal” period pictures made in the early 1990s: Miller’s Crossing (1990), Barton Fink (1991), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994).

More videos and reviews at the superb The Directors Series.

“Instagram user Phil Grishayev, who we first learned about on Design Taxi, documents famous movie locations — the way they look then and now. He publishes a side-by-side comparison of scenes from popular films, and the occasional historic photo, revealing what’s different and, in some cases, how time stands still.”

More at Flavorwire.

“Dutch cinematographer Robby Müller has given us some of the most transcendent images ever captured on-screen. Since beginning his career in the late sixties, he has lensed a wealth of indelible moments—from Harry Dean Stanton wandering alone through the vast Southwestern desert in Wim Wenders’s Paris, Texas to the jailbirds of Jim Jarmusch’s Down by Law on their odyssey through the lush Louisiana bayou. This summer, Müller’s inimitable career is being honored with a retrospective at the Eye museum in Amsterdam.”

More at The Criterion Current.

“Wenders, while so very influenced by American movies and pop culture, is not American and thus not constrained by this unspoken, insidious mandate to preserve the notion of children as idealized by adults. His freedom of imagination and thought to create Alice, and the room he granted his actors, Rottländer and Rüdiger Vogler, resulted in one of the screen’s most multifaceted child characters, and one of the most empowered female characters in cinema to this day.”

More at The Criterion Current.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me has been scrubbed from the memories of many Twin Peaks fans, but it’s best not to forget that David Bowie was in the film, as Agent Phillip Jeffries. He appears as a dream vision in a weird montage to his former buddies Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) and Gordon Cole (David Lynch) and provides key information to cracking the case. It seems now that Bowie had signed on to reprise the role for Showtime’s upcoming revival of the show, though his passing in January came too soon for him to film his parts.”

More at Flavorwire.