You can now download issues of the pulp horror and fantasy magazine (1923-1954), which includes stories by H. P. Lovecraft, Ray Bradbury, and many more. Source: Open Culture.Save

“For the first time in 50 years, rare Bloomsbury interiors designed by artists Vanessa Bell, Roger Fry and Duncan Grant, and reassembled from public and private collection across the country, have been brought together to celebrate Bloomsbury’s wider contribution to Britain’s early 20th-century avant-garde.”

More at AnOther.

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“Vasily Grossman‘s Life and Fate (New York Review Books Classics) was deemed so dangerous in the Soviet Union that not only was the manuscript confiscated – the typewriter ribbons used to type it were taken as well. As Book Haven readers know, I’ve been ploughing through the 880-page epic tale of World War II, which eloquently, powerfully, unforgettably describes the dark forces that shaped the 20th century. […] The author had witnessed the Battle of Stalingrad as a war correspondent, and provided the first eyewitness accounts of an extermination camp, from Treblinka.”

More at Cynthia Haven’s excellent website, The Book Haven.

“Three very influential artists are partaking in the making of an upcoming Netflix miniseries. The first is Margaret Atwood, providing source material through her based-on-a-true-story crime novel, Alias Grace. The second is writer/director/actor Sarah Polley — known for her beautiful documentary Stories We Tell her odd, contemplative rom-com, Take This Waltz, and her Oscar nominated drama, Away From Her. According to Deadline, she’ll be writing and producing. And the third is American Psycho‘s Mary Harron, who’ll be directing.”

More at Flavorwire.

Finnegans Wake imagined technology which did not even exist. It is a novel—if we are to call it such—written for the 21st century, and perhaps the only way it can be adapted in other media is through the internet’s nonlinear, labyrinthine structures; the online project First We Feel Then We Fall does just that, creating a multimedia adaptation of Finnegans Wake that “transfers” the novel ‘to audiovisual language,’ and demonstrates the novel as—in the words of The Guardian’s Billy Mills—’the book the web was invented for.'”

More at Open Culture.

Source: Harriet: The Blog.