Euan Monaghan (LitHub) talks to the American writer, in an interview originally published in Structo Magazine
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Ursula K. Le Guin, by taros
It’s not hard to see why Ursula K. Le Guin is best known for her early novels. In the space of six years came A Wizard of Earthsea (1968), The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), The Lathe of Heaven (1971) and The Dispossessed (1974). These books and many others—including Lavinia (2008), an astonishing take on Virgil’s Aeneid—have been a steady influence on authors of the imagination, notably Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, David Mitchell, Salman Rushdie and Zadie Smith, who said that “Le Guin writes as well as any non-‘genre’ writer alive.” We talked at Le Guin’s home in Portland, Oregon.

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Beckett Festival 2016 at The Print Room/Coronet, Notting Hill Gate, London.
May 17 – June 5 2016.

Following their hugely successful run of Title and Deed by Will Eno last year, Gare St Lazare Ireland return with a festival of their acclaimed Beckett productions.

Internationally regarded among the foremost Beckett interpreters they have toured all over the world with their exquisite productions. Featuring 5 prose pieces and their collaboration with London composer Paul Clark (Clod Ensemble) the festival will also have a number of free public conversations and ancillary events and will feature an installation by senior Irish artist Brian O’Doherty entitled ‘Hello Sam’. 2016 is the 110th anniversary of the birth of Samuel Beckett. It is also the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising in Dublin which led to Irish independence and this event, supported by Culture Ireland, is part of an international program of Irish cultural events to mark the centenary. [Find Out More]

University of Kent • 4-5 May 2016
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Samuel Beckett

The Samuel Beckett and World Literature conference, funded by the Centre for Modern European Literature and the Faculty of Humanities, will be held at the University of Kent, Canterbury on 4-5 May 2016. (more…)

Owen Pritchard (It’s Nice That) reports on a new artwork by Cornelia Parker
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Cornelia Parker, Transitional Object (PsychoBarn)

British Artist Cornelia Parker has erected a replica of the house from Alfred Hitchcock’s seminal thriller Psycho on top of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. The commission will be on display, weather permitting, until 31 October this year. The work, titled Transitional Object (PsychoBarn), is a reconstruction of part of the iconic weather boarded mansion, consisting of two facades propped up by scaffolding. The 30ft tall artwork was fabricated from materials salvaged from a deconstructed red barn. [Read More]