Month: February 2016

Women of Abstract Expressionism

Ryan Steadman (Observer Culture) on a new retrospective at Denver Art Museum
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nder-recognized female artists throughout history are slowly but surely starting to get the attention they deserve. First there was a look at the women of the Surrealist movement at Sotheby’s last summer, and now a show that’s being dubbed the “first museum exhibition dedicated to the women of Abstract Expressionism” is set to open at the Denver Art Museum in June.
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Portraits of Wittgenstein

Tim Crane (TLS) reflects on the life and work of the enigmatic Austrian philosopher

Among all twentieth-century thinkers, Ludwig Wittgenstein stands out as the one whose life fascinates almost as much as his work does. Even the life of Martin Heidegger, with his controversial Nazi connections and his later attempt to live the authentic life of a peasant, looks dull and suburban by comparison. Wittgenstein was born in 1889 into one of Austria’s richest families. His father was a self-made industrialist who built his fortune in iron and steel; his mother came from a Prague Jewish family. Ludwig was the youngest of eight siblings – he had three sisters and four brothers. Tragedy hit the family again and again. Three of Ludwig’s brothers committed suicide. The fourth, Paul, was a concert pianist who lost his right arm in the First World War and later commissioned works for the left hand from Ravel, Prokofiev, Paul Hindemith and Erich Korngold. (Music figured significantly in the family’s life: Brahms, Mahler and Richard Strauss were among the composers who heard their works performed at the Wittgenstein house in Vienna.) Ludwig originally studied engineering, first in Berlin and then in Manchester, where he became interested in the design of aeroplane propellors. At this time he developed a deep interest in mathematics and its foundations. Having studied the ground-breaking works of philosophy of mathematics by Bertrand Russell and Gottlob Frege, he visited Frege in Jena who advised him to study with Russell in Cambridge. Wittgenstein turned up, unannounced, at Russell’s rooms in Trinity College in October 1911, and discussed philosophy with Russell regularly over the next few months. Russell wrote to Ottoline Morrell that his “Austrian engineer” was “rather good” but “very argumentative and tiresome”. But Russell was sufficiently impressed to accept Wittgenstein as a student at Cambridge in 1912. Wittgenstein had a huge impact on the intellectual scene there, but throughout his life he claimed to dislike Cambridge and preferred to spend time writing and thinking in remote, isolated places (Norway and Ireland were favourites).
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Translating Kafka: Willa & Edwin Muir

Josh Billings (Asymptote) profiles Kafka’s first major English translators

For Willa and Edwin Muir, the Scottish couple whose translations of Franz Kafka, Hermann Broch and many others introduced English-language readers to some of the greatest German modernists, translation was a gift and a curse. On the one hand, it offered them money and a sense of accomplishment; on the other, it encroached on the writing that both of them, at different points in their lives, considered a true calling. But no matter how they thought about it, translation remained a means of survival for the couple: a lifeboat in which they bobbed, happily or at odds, through some of the most treacherous waters of the 20th century. [Read More]

Ernst Haas on Photography and Expression

Known as a chronicler of 20th Century life in America and beyond, the photographer reflects on how he approaches his art
ernst-haas
Photograph: Ernst Haas
Photograph: Ernst Haas
Photograph: Ernst Haas
Photograph: Ernst Haas
Photograph: Ernst Haas

“We can write the new chapters in a visual language whose prose and poetry will need no translation.”

— Ernst Haas
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